Nov 02

Audivi vocem [I heard a voice] (Jeremiah 40:10, Matthew 25:6) – Thomas Tallis

350px-thomas_tallisMusic text:

I heard a voice coming from heaven: Come, all ye most wise virgins, store up oil in your vessels, until the bridegroom cometh. A cry goes up at midnight: Behold, the bridegroom cometh.

Source of text:
Jeremiah 40:10, Matthew 25:6

10 As for me, behold, I will dwell at Mizpah, to serve the Chaldeans, which will come unto us: but ye, gather ye wine, and summer fruits, and oil, and put them in your vessels, and dwell in your cities that ye have taken.

And at midnight there was a cry made, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him.

Audivi vocem, motet composed by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)


Performed by New York Polyphony

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Audivi Vocem / From the Album Tudor City / New York Polyphony / Avie Records

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A Tallis Anthology composed by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585). Edited by John Milsom. Arranged by Milsom. For Mixed Choir. Mixed Voices. Sacred. Choral Collection. 128 pages. Published by Oxford University Press

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Sep 07

Verily, verily I say unto you (John 6:53-56) – Thomas Tallis

Thomas Tallis, c. 1505–1585

Thomas Tallis, c. 1505–1585 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John 6:53-56

53 Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you.

54 Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day.

55 For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

56 He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him.

Verily, verily I say unto you, composed by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)


Performed by St. Joseph choir of Wekerle. Gergely Kaposi conducts the orchestra of Matthias Church.

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Tallis: Verily, verily I say unto you / The Tallis Scholars sing Thomas Tallis: Spem in alium / Gimell Records

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A Tallis Anthology composed by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585). Edited by John Milsom. Arranged by Milsom. For Mixed Choir. Mixed Voices. Sacred. Choral Collection. 128 pages. Published by Oxford University Press (OU.9780193534100). 

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Choral Public Domain Library

Nov 18

God grant with grace (Psalm 67:1-2) – Thomas Tallis

 

Archbishop Matthew Parker (1504-1575)

Archbishop Matthew Parker (1504-1575) (Image via Wikipedia)

Psalm 67:1-2

God be merciful unto us, and bless us; and cause his face to shine upon us; Selah.

That thy way may be known upon earth, thy saving health among all nations.

[Psalter text by Archbishop of Canterbury Matthew Parker:]

God grant with grace, he us embrace,
in gentle part bless he our heart.
With loving face shine he in place,
his mercies all on us to fall.
That we thy way may know all day,
while we do sail this world so frail.
Thy health’s reward is nigh declared,
as plain as eye all gentiles spy.

God grant with grace (published in 1567), also known as “Tallis’s Canon,” the eighth of nine tunes contributed by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585) for Archbishop Parker’s Psalter. As Parker described it, “The eyghte goeth milde: in modest pace.”


Performed by Alamire, directed by David Skinner

 

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MP3: Eighth Tune: God grant with grace, performed by Stile Antico, from the album Heavenly Harmonies / Harmonia Mundi

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Oct 21

Why fumeth in fight (Psalm 2:1-2) – Thomas Tallis

 

Thomas Tallis, c. 1505–1585

Thomas Tallis, c. 1505–1585 (Image via Wikipedia)

Psalm 2:1-2

Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing?

The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his anointed,

[Psalter text by Archbishop of Canterbury Matthew Parker:]

Why fum’th in fight the Gentiles spite, in fury raging stout?
Why tak’th in hand the people fond, vain things to bring about?
The Kings arise, the Lords devise, in counsels met thereto,
against the Lord with false accord, against His Christ they go.

Why fumeth in fight (published in 1567), the third of nine tunes contributed by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585) for Archbishop Parker’s Psalter. As Parker described it, “The third doth rage: and roughly bray’th.” Nearly 350 years later, it was the inspiration for Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis.


Performed by Alamire, directed by David Skinner


Performed by BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Andrew Davis
“At the Gloucester Cathedral (where it in 1910 was played for the first time and conducted by Vaughan Williams himself)”

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MP3: Third Tune: Why fum’th in fight, performed by Stile Antico, from the album Heavenly Harmonies / Harmonia Mundi

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