Feb 23

Zwei Motetten [Two Motets] (Job 3:20-23; Lamentations 3:41; James 5:11) – Johannes Brahms

English: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897), german c...

English: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897), german composer Deutsch: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897), deutscher Komponist (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From the first motet, “Warum ist das Licht gegeben den Mühseligen,” which includes Job 3:20-23; Lamentations 3:41; James 5:11 [German]

20 Wherefore is light given to him that is in misery, and life unto the bitter in soul;

21 Which long for death, but it cometh not; and dig for it more than for hid treasures;

22 Which rejoice exceedingly, and are glad, when they can find the grave?

23 Why is light given to a man whose way is hid, and whom God hath hedged in?

41 Let us lift up our heart with our hands unto God in the heavens.

11 Behold, we count them happy which endure. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.

Zwei Motetten, Op. 74 (1877 for the first motet, which uses Biblical texts), by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)


Performed by Sofia Vokalensemble

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MP3: Zwei Motetten für gemischten Chor, op. 74: I. Warum ist das Licht gegeben den Mühseligen? / Johannes Brahms / Bella Musica Edition

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Warum ist das Licht gegeben (aus: Zwei Motetten). By Johannes Brahms (1833-1897). Edited by Gunter Graulich. For SSATBB Choir. D-Moll (D minor). German title: Warum ist das Licht gegeben. Sacred, Chamber Choir – Recommended by Frieder Bernius; Occasions: Mourning, Death. Level 3. Full score. Language: German. Op. 74, No. 1. 8 pages. Duration 7 minutes. Published by Carus Verlag (CA.4012010).

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Apr 06

Lamentations of Jeremiah (Lamentations 1:1-2,6,10-11; 2:8,12-13; 3:1-2,22,27; 4:1-2; 5:1-5) – Tomás Luis de Victoria

"Jeremiah Lamenting the Destruction of Je...

"Jeremiah Lamenting the Destruction of Jerusalem" by Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lamentations 1:1-2,6,10-11; 2:8,12a,13a; 3:1-2,22,27; 4:1-2; 5:1-5 [Latin]

How doth the city sit solitary, that was full of people! how is she become as a widow! she that was great among the nations, and princess among the provinces, how is she become tributary!

She weepeth sore in the night, and her tears are on her cheeks: among all her lovers she hath none to comfort her: all her friends have dealt treacherously with her, they are become her enemies.

And from the daughter of Zion all her beauty is departed: her princes are become like harts that find no pasture, and they are gone without strength before the pursuer.

10 The adversary hath spread out his hand upon all her pleasant things: for she hath seen that the heathen entered into her sanctuary, whom thou didst command that they should not enter into thy congregation.

11 All her people sigh, they seek bread; they have given their pleasant things for meat to relieve the soul: see, O LORD, and consider; for I am become vile.

The LORD hath purposed to destroy the wall of the daughter of Zion: he hath stretched out a line, he hath not withdrawn his hand from destroying: therefore he made the rampart and the wall to lament; they languished together.

12 They say to their mothers, Where is corn and wine? when they swooned as the wounded in the streets of the city, when their soul was poured out into their mothers’ bosom.

13 What thing shall I take to witness for thee? what thing shall I liken to thee, O daughter of Jerusalem? what shall I equal to thee, that I may comfort thee, O virgin daughter of Zion? for thy breach is great like the sea: who can heal thee?

I AM the man that hath seen affliction by the rod of his wrath.

He hath led me, and brought me into darkness, but not into light.

22 It is of the LORD’s mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not.

27 It is good for a man that he bear the yoke in his youth.

How is the gold become dim! how is the most fine gold changed! the stones of the sanctuary are poured out in the top of every street.

The precious sons of Zion, comparable to fine gold, how are they esteemed as earthen pitchers, the work of the hands of the potter!

Remember, O LORD, what is come upon us: consider, and behold our reproach.

Our inheritance is turned to strangers, our houses to aliens.

We are orphans and fatherless, our mothers are as widows.

We have drunken our water for money; our wood is sold unto us.

Our necks are under persecution: we labour, and have no rest.

Lamentations of Jeremiah (1585, from Officium Hebdomadae Sanctae) by Tomás Luis de Victoria [Ital.: da Vittoria] (1548–1611)


Performed by Tallis Scholars (First Lamentation for Maundy Thursday, Lamentations 1:1-2)

 

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